Risk Behaviors, Occupational Risk and Seroprevalence of Hepatitis B and A Infections among Public Cleansing Workers of Bangkok Metropolis

authors:

avatar Pipat Luksamijarulkul 1 , * , avatar Dusit Sujirarat 2 , avatar Phitaya Charupoonphol 2

Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University, [email protected], Thailand
Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University, Thailand

how to cite: Luksamijarulkul P, Sujirarat D, Charupoonphol P. Risk Behaviors, Occupational Risk and Seroprevalence of Hepatitis B and A Infections among Public Cleansing Workers of Bangkok Metropolis. Hepat Mon.8(1): 35-40.

Abstract

Background and Aims: Public cleansing workers, especially public garbage collectors are probably at risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis A virus (HAV) infections. This study was designed to assess risky behaviors, occupational risk and seroprevalence of HBV and HAV infections in this group.
Methods: 354 public cleansing workers of Bangkok Metropolis (185 cleaners and 169 garbage collectors) were randomly selected by multi-stage sampling. The subjects were interviewed and their blood pecimens were collected to investigate HBV seromarkers (HBsAg, anti-HBs and anti-HBc) and anti-HAV by voluntary participation.
Results: Out of 354 workers, 22.6% had tattoos, 15.8% had a history of regular alcohol consumption, and 6.8% had a history of extramarital sex without using condoms in a previous year. Public garbage collectors had relatively higher percentage than public cleaners. Also, public garbage collectors had significantly higher percentage of occupational risks including a history of contact with blood, a history of contact with used condom, syringe or needle, and a history of needle stick or sharp puncture than public cleaners (P= 0.0018, 0.0067 & 0.0012, respectively). Results from blood screening revealed 49.4% of HBV seropositivity, 5.9% of HBsAg, 37.3% of anti-HBs, 6.2% of anti-HBc only, and 85% of anti-HAV antibody. Public garbage collectors had significantly higher HBV seropositivity than public cleaners (P=0.0058), while there was no statistical significance in anti-HAV positivity between groups. Risk factors for HBV seropositiveness after multivariate analysis were occupation (adjusted OR=1.76, P=0.0027), a history of contact with used condom, syringe or needle (adjusted OR=3.02, P<0.0001), and a history of needle stick or sharp puncture (adjusted OR=4.21, P<0.0001).
Conclusions: This study supported public cleansing workers; especially public garbage collectors were at risk for HBV and/or HAV infections. The risk reduction programs including a 100% condom use, life skills education, hygienic practice, use of safer equipment for collecting garbage, and HBV vaccination should be provided for this group.

Full Text

Full text is available in PDF

© 0, Author(s). This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.