Investigating the Effect of Simultaneous Dual Task Execution on the Balance Position of People with Forward Head Posture

authors:

avatar Ali Feiz Khademi ORCID 1 , avatar Hooman Minoonejad ORCID 2 , * , avatar Mahdieh Akoochakian ORCID 3 , avatar Yosef Moghadas Tabrizi ORCID 4

PhD student, Department of Pathology and Corrective Movements, Kish International University, Kish, Iran
Associate Professor, Department of Sports injury and biomechanics, Faculty of Sport Sciences and health, university of Tehran, Tehran, Iran
Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Kish International University, Kish, Iran
Assistant Professor, Department of Sports injury and biomechanics, Faculty of Sport Sciences and health, university of Tehran, Tehran, Iran

how to cite: Feiz Khademi A, Minoonejad H, Akoochakian M, Moghadas Tabrizi Y. Investigating the Effect of Simultaneous Dual Task Execution on the Balance Position of People with Forward Head Posture. J Motor Control Learn. 2023;5(3):e143460. 

Abstract

Background: The present study has been conducted with the aim of the effect of the simultaneous implementation of the dual task on the dynamic balance of people with forward head posture. 
Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 40 male students with forward head posture and 40 normal male students were purposefully selected to participate in the present study. After familiarizing the participants with the test implementation conditions (dynamic balance with cognitive task and dynamic balance without cognitive task), each of the tests was performed three times, and between each performance, the subject rested for 30 seconds. 
Results: The results shown that there is significant difference between the dynamic balance of the participants with forward head posture position and normal participants, and the participants with forward head posture statistically have weaker dynamic balance (P<0.05). Also, the implementation of the dual task has a significant effect on the balance of both groups of participants with forward head and normal posture and statistically weakens the dynamic balance of participants with forward head posture and normal participants (P<0.05). 
Conclusion: In general, the results of the research made it clear that the posture of the forward head posture will cause the loss and decrease of the stability of the person's posture. Also, in both groups of people with forward head and normal posture, performing a dual task leads to the weakening of postural stability.

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